Date:

Saturday 15th June 2019 – 10:00 to 4.30 *

*9.45 Registration, tea and coffee for a 10.00 start
6 hours continuing professional development (CPD)

Fee:

£90.00 plus vat – £108.00

Venue:

Jurys Inn Brighton, 101, Stroudley Road, Brighton BN1 4DJ
Tel: 01273 862121

Presenter:

Dr. Peter Jakob.

Dr Peter Jakob

 

 

 

 

 

Application for tickets:

Payment by cheque and credit card, Cheques should be made payable to CfED

Or contact:

The Administrator, CfED, 18a Clermont Road, Brighton, BN1 6SG
Tel: 01273 561511
e-mail address – info@emotionaldevelopment.co.uk

Introduction to NVR

A new innovative approach for dealing with aggressive, harmful, and self-destructive behaviour in children and young people. An overview of its principles and methods.
This workshop with Dr Peter Jakob is held and run by The Centre for Emotional Developmet

Non Violent Resistance (NVR) was originally developed by Haim Omer and his team at the University of Tel Aviv as It helps parents, schools and communities respond more effectively to such problems as child to parent violence, young people at risk of sexual or criminal exploitation, drug misuse, self-harm, anxiety disorders in which the young person does not cooperate in treatment, or the ‘entitled dependency’ of younger adults who become socially withdrawn. Deriving its methods from the principles of raising parental presence, de-escalation and reconciliation, NVR promotes constructive resistance to harmful behaviour, while seeking to support adults in reconnecting with their child and developing a non-punitive yet strong and emotionally containing parental position.

By supporting adults to act in reconciliatory ways towards the young person, whilst at the same time helping them to develop an effective network of adult supporters, NVR is a relational approach, which integrates systemic and attachment-orientated perspectives. By working with and through the adults, we can help young people overcome serious behavioural problems, even and especially when they themselves do not cooperate in the therapeutic process.

Peter Jakob has introduced NVR to the UK and developed specific ways of working with trauma and attachment difficulties in NVR. This brief one day workshop will give an insight into the underlying principles and philosophy of NVR and introduce some of its core methods. It will also illustrate the specific child-focussed and trauma-focussed ways of working with NVR. Participants will receive information on the rapidly growing evidence base for NVR, and the many new applications of the approach.

Methods

We use PowerPoint presentation, video clips, role play, small group exercises and discussion to create a lively experiential learning environment for this first introduction to the principles and methods of NVR.

The workshop will look at:
• Symmetrical escalation and de-escalation;
• Deferred responsiveness;
• Caregiver ‘erasure’ experiences and the concept of caregiver presence
• Positive action methods: announcement, campaign of concern, sit-in, tailing;
• Reconciliation gestures and child focused work in NVR;
• The NVR support network;
• Helping traumatised children and young people process shame;
• Evidence base for NVR.

Bibliography

Dr Peter Jakob
Consultant Clinical Psychologist

With a background in social work, Peter has worked as Clinical Psychologist and Family Therapist in both CAMHS and Adult Mental Health for 35 years, specialising in children and families involved with child protective services. He has in-depth knowledge of treating trauma as the after-effect of childhood sexual abuse and other forms of sexual violence, physical abuse, neglect and domestic violence, as well as extensive experience in providing therapy for parents’ mental health problems.

Peter has introduced Non Violent Resistance to the UK. He has adapted the approach for heavily traumatised, multi-stressed families, and his work with looked-after children has inspired him to develop a child focus in NVR. Peter is a prolific national and international presenter.

Aiming to develop collaborative working relationships in which dialogue can flourish and service users’ experience and perspectives are centred in conversation, Peter considers social awareness as a cornerstone of engaged therapeutic practice.